quinta-feira, 26 de abril de 2018

SLEEP - THE SCIENCES [2018] REVIEW



On April 20th here by known as the "Weedian Day", legendary metal stoners Sleep, dropped their long awaited full length... much to everyone's surprise! Titled The Sciences and released by Jack White´s label Third Man Records, the heavy chronic trio delivers a glorious follow up to their magnum opus Dopesmoker [2003]. A sequel of some sort to that hashishian odyssey, with the weird tale of a procession of weed-priests in a stoner caravan and their journey to find the riff filled land. The cannabis saga told through distorted, downtuned, and slow monolithic riffs in repetition and narrated with holy spiritual passages enchanted as in a religious ceremony that quickly induces us in an hypnotic state, continues as we now join Marijuanaut, after leaving Earth to cultivate, on the quest for Planet Iommia through mesmerizing visual soundscapes of the galactic sea, hashteroid fields and alien skies.

The album starts with the title track "The Sciences", an intro with a drone guitar as if in a Morse Code transmission, until a bong hit by Al Cisneros and "Marijuanaut´s Theme" departures in a cloud of smoke into a powerful galloping ascending ride in a distant galaxy with cosmic groves, gravitational riffs and OM´s heavy shamanic atmosphere. As the weedian plot develops with "Sonic Titan" and "Antarticans Tawed", material written during the Dopesmoker days, classic songs now righteously recorded in all their glory to fulfill their place in the soundtrack of the story we follow more than 15 years later. These tracks bring out the quintessential Sleep from the early days of Sabbath and Weed worship, balancing perfectly among the new material with the same aesthetic but more meditative and align with Cisnero´s other band, revealing himself through magnific solos and enthralling riffs, not only, as the driving force behind this music, but also, as one of the greatest bass players of our generation. In a tribute both to the city and Black Sabbath´s bass player "Giza Butler" is perhaps the best example of this refined recipe of entrancing heavy tribalism metal impossible for others to emulate and that makes their sound so unique. Closing out with "The Botanist", an heavy instrumental that delves into a chill out piece, Pike lays down his most inspired solo on a magical dubbed out groove between Cisneros e Roeder bringing a perfect end to another chapter of this epic poetry and chimerical sonic recital.

In a time where reunions are fashionable and often nothing more than simple "money grabs", Sleep manages to genuinely cement their legacy with another monstrous release. Praise Iommi and let the weedian proceed!

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